Kahr Handgun Forum banner
1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I purchased a Kahr CM4043 .40 S&W semiautomatic to meet my need for a small powerful sub-compact pistol to carry concealed in a front pants pocket.
I ordered the pistol online from grabagun.com. The cost was $360 including shipping. I made additional purchases of A DeSantis Nemesis pocket holster and four 7-round magazines.


The specs for the CM40 as listed on the Kahr website are:
.40 Smith & Wesson
Operation: Trigger Cocking DAO; lock breech; "Browning - type" recoil lug; passive striker block: no magazine disconnect
Barrel: 3.1", conventional rifling; 1 - 16 right-hand twist
Length O/A: 5.47"
Height: 4.0"
Slide Width: .94"
Weight: Pistol 15.8 ounces, Magazine 1.9 ounces
Grips: Textured polymer
Sights: Drift adjustable white bar-dot combat rear sight, pinned in polymer front sight
Finish: Black polymer frame, matte stainless steel slide
Standard OEM Magazine: 5 round flush floor plate

The CM40 is a sturdy well-built striker-fire weapon. It is comprised of a steel-slide and polymer-frame. Surprisingly, I found this small pistol to be more similar to a 1911 hammer-fire all steel semiautomatic than to a striker-fire Glock.
The visual impression of this CM40 is that it is an all business, no frills deadly weapon.

I found this to be an accurate assessment during my first range session today. The tolerances of the CM40 are extremely tight. I do not consider this to be a bad thing. To the contrary, I believe the tight slide to frame fit and exceptionally stiff recoil spring make for an accurate firearm.

The manual indicates that the pistol requires a 200 round break-in period. My range session validates this. At first, hand racking the slide was difficult. However, repetitive shooting began to lessen the tightness of slide movement. By the end of my session, shooting 80 rounds each of FMJ and JHP ammunition, hand racking the slide was no longer difficult for me to do.
Recoil was not too sharp with either the FMJ or the JHP rounds that I used. To be specific, I shot Remington L40SW2B JHP .40 S&W 180gr with a muzzle velocity of 1015fps and Winchester Q4328 FMJ .40 S&W 180gr with a muzzle velocity of 1020fps.

Any thought that the CM40 could be a recreational target gun was soon disproved to me after only a few magazines of firing. Shooting this pistol is not my idea of fun at the range. The CM40 is what it is, an easy to conceal protector for close quarter’s encounters.

Regarding how the gun functioned this first time at the range breaking it in, I experienced a single jam (attributed to my not properly loading the round into the magazine.
I was accurate at seven yards and could probably print decent kill patterns at even further distances. But, my purpose today was simply to familiarize myself with the pistol and look for problem areas. Next time, I will focus on accuracy.
I used an identity flaw target for my first two 5-round magazines to see about the sights and my hand grip control:




I aimed one round high and one round low to check the front sight. My next eight rounds were scattered in the bullseye. My accuracy with this small pistol surprised me. I did not expect to shoot this well with it. So much for anticipation.

For its primary purpose, I think the small CM40 is a good choice for pocket conceal carry. The cost of the gun is modest and the value apparent.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,468 Posts
Good job...........great review.........I think you pretty much nailed it on the shoot ability and useful purpose of the gun, thanks for the review !!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,021 Posts
Good write up aimtrue. Welcome to the forum and that does sound like a good price.

bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Nice review. I have a couple of .40 Glocks and a 9 mm Kahr. In the Glock G23 the .40 rounds have a noticeable kick. The Kahr has a noticeable kick with +P 9 mm. Not bad but you know it went off. I can see where a CM40 might not be fun as a range gun but I bet it will do the job if you have to pull it to save your life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Went to the range for the second time. Got there at 6AM. It was dark yet light enough to see my short distance target. it was cold (39F). Wore a jacket, hat and gloves. I am a wimp; cannot handle cold weather anymore.

I think I finished the break-in of my CM40. By the time I sent 200 more 180gr rounds downrange today in a matter of 1-1/2hours. It was a tiring practice. My hands, arms and shoulders took quite a pounding. The cold air did not help. Fortunately, there was no wind.

Whereas I had only had one jam during my initial time with the pistol, this time I had four jams shooting my final five magazines. I believe my fatigue and not properly gripping the gun with firm hands caused these jam.

The pistol has a longer trigger pull than I am used to. It is much longer than any handgun I have fired. Because of this long trigger pull and the small size of the gun, I found myself developing BAD habits. I jerked the trigger which is something I seldom do and I began to flinch just before the bang. Yes, I kept anticipating the recoil and flash.

I will have to work on these things in the future. Also, I could not keep my pistol steady on the desired aiming point as time went on. Instead, I jerked when I pulled (not squeezed) the trigger. I really had to concentrate and control my mind as well as my body when I shot this gun; otherwise, I sprayed the target like a novice. When I was able to control the basics, I printed good patterns on target.

My CM40 now seems fairly well broken-in. I am confident to carry it concealed on a daily basis. It is not unreliable. I am convinced that the jams were not mechanically a failure of the gun. They were simply my fault. I was slovenly in my control and allowed my fatigue to alter my accuracy.

When I carry, it will not be after shooting 200 rounds. I will be fresh. The pistol is my protection at close range not a target gun from which I send 200+ rounds downrange within a hour or so.

I am chagrined to admit that I have not mastered the take-down to clean and lube the pistol. It is a simple procedure but my clumsy hands have not made the job easy. Practice, practice and more practice should resolve this matter for me.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,468 Posts
When I carry, it will not be after shooting 200 rounds. I will be fresh. The pistol is my protection at close range not a target gun from which I send 200+ rounds downrange within a hour or so.

I am chagrined to admit that I have not mastered the take-down to clean and lube the pistol. It is a simple procedure but my clumsy hands have not made the job easy. Practice, practice and more practice should resolve this matter for me.
You nailed it right there in the first sentence quoted..............bottom line is its a SD gun, not a fun to shoot range gun !! As far as the take down, it gets easier the more you do it......
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,021 Posts
I've found two ways to help with getting the lock pin removal started. First though remove the slide and take the lock pin and holding it approx. at the clocked position it would be inserted to match the slide and push it in and out numerous times. From what I see it rounds the sharp edge of the mating Spring edge and the grooved circumference of the pin that marries up to the spring. Spring I'm talking about is on the outside of the LH slide the must be lined up with with pin at insertion in the gun.
I push the slide back to lin up the notches then hold in position with the heal of my palm against the barrel line up the pin to the dowel or table and push.

1. Cut a 3/8" to 7/8" diameter X 2-4" long wood dowel and with the pistol LH side up place the pin on the standing dowel end and push down to push the pin flush with gun body. This gets the pin started. If I can't pull the pin out yet I use an old unusable flat screw driver with tip covered in several turns of duct tape so that with tip of the screwdriver under the pin stop and the tape covered area will be against the plastic portion of the side of the gun so as to not mark it.
note: I intend to make a flat screwdriver out of a sanded down dowel to replace the tape covered screwdriver.
2. instead of using a dowel put the pin location on the corner of a table or bench or something similar and press down on the gun as you did with the dowel.

Lots of ideas will work but this is currently what I'm doing.

Hope I've made myself clear.

bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you guys for your comments. I appreciate you helping me to better master this gun's unique features.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,021 Posts
I been thinking about the dowel method as described in previous post #8. I think I'm going to improve that idea buy making a 2x4x4" base with a hole in the middle of the side that I will glue a 3 to 4" long 3/8-1/2" Dia dowel in to and use it as described. This will make it more stable to use to remove push the end of the stop pin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,945 Posts
I been thinking about the dowel method as described in previous post #8. I think I'm going to improve that idea buy making a 2x4x4" base with a hole in the middle of the side that I will glue a 3 to 4" long 3/8-1/2" Dia dowel in to and use it as described. This will make it more stable to use to remove push the end of the stop pin.
I like your idea and seeing as you have not yet applied for a patent I am going to make one. I will wait until I have both hands to use.:)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,021 Posts
I forgot you're still in Heal mode. That 40 must be a real kick. Have you shot a 45 and if so how's it compare to the 40? I'm leaning 45 in the future. The one thing though, as you said, the 40 is a protection guy not a target practice gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,945 Posts
I forgot you're still in Heal mode. That 40 must be a real kick. Have you shot a 45 and if so how's it compare to the 40? I'm leaning 45 in the future. The one thing though, as you said, the 40 is a protection guy not a target practice gun.
I am still in heal mode but I do not have a 40. I did shoot a 45 once but that was many years ago.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,021 Posts
Oh goodness John of course! I got you mixed up with the originator of the thread aimtrue. He was complaining of arms and shoulders taking a pounding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
xsailer, I have always thought it important that a carry gun be one that could be field stripped without a tool. My Glocks, FNs and 1911 all can be taken down by use of my hands alone. So far with the CM, I have not been able to push the slide pin out without use of a tool. I hope in time to be able to do so.

At present I do not know if I cannot do so because of poor technique or the design of the CM.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,021 Posts
As Toney said I've seen several owners take theirs down by pushing with their finger and some on U tube also but I still can't do it and hold the slide to the "notch". It is a lot better than it was. When I first did it when new I had to use a plastic hammer for cry'n out loud. Ridiculous!! I think if guy was very careful he could round the sharp edge on the pin groove to spring contact area. By being "careful" I mean with a light abrasive, maybe a 600+ grit black sandpaper and lightly as you check with the pin often. I sure wouldn't want to make it so it would fall out for sure. I'm probably just going to continue using mine and hope it gets easier to remove. Again I say, it is easier now. Toney might have some critique of my suggestion. He is a lot more knowledgeable than I on stuff like this.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,218 Posts
My grip taking the in out. I can't see the witness mark on this side, I line the marks up, then I turn it over and push the pin, if it doesn't move I move the slide a little while pushing. Wood Trigger Gun barrel Air gun Gun accessory
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,468 Posts
Really........do ya think.......I guess the designers didn't take it apart.........
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top