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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
At the range, I shoot mostly my own .380 reloads using a 95 gr. .355 Winchester jacketed flat point on top of 3.1 grains of WW 231 powder, light taper crimp on the cannalure. This is a very light target load, easy on me, easy on the gun, 'has enough force to cycle the slide and lock it back after the last round.

(Note: With regard to posted reloading data, mistakes, typos, etc. happen. Always check any poster's load data with a reputable reloading manual from Speer, Hornady, Sierra, Lyman, etc. before duplicating to ensure it is within safe limits.) The Moderators.
 

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I use 3.2 grains of 231 with 95 grain Rainier bullets. Works well and cycles in all of my 380s.

(Note: With regard to posted reloading data, mistakes, typos, etc. happen. Always check any poster's load data with a reputable reloading manual from Speer, Hornady, Sierra, Lyman, etc. before duplicating to ensure it is within safe limits.) The Moderators.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks guys for helpful info. My dealer has no 380 in stock, neither does WalMart. Guess I'll have to buy some dies, bullets, and powder, and primers too.

What primer do you guys use?

Cheers,
og
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I should have been more specific....what BRAND of primers are you guys using? I prefer CCI and use them for all my rifle reloads.

Not much help in that link thread about primers except some concern about some brands.

Been reloading a long time. One thing I note reading reloading receipes on the internet is most people forget to say what primer they use. Everybody talks about their powder, etc.

og
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I do not use CCI primers as I have found them to be hair oversized compared to other brands - at least this has been my experience over the years and they have contributed to hard seating. Winchester primers tend to be "hard" and depending on the gun ('had this problem in my XD45c) can contribute to light strikes in some guns - very important that you check seating depth - run your finger across the seated primers, if you feel any that are slightly raised you could have a problem. I have not tried Remngton in a long while and have never sampled Magtech. The only brand I now use is Federal, my favorite - depending on caliber, either standard small or large pistol. Your mileage may differ.
 

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These are my two .380 loads. I prefer the 95 gr. Speer Gold Dots and the 95 gr. Speer TMJ's (when you can get them).

Bob

380 ACP
LOADED OVERALL LENGTH=0.980
MAX CASE LENGTH=0.680
CASE TRIM LENGTH=0.670
WSP Primer, Win./Starline /Federal Brass

90 gr. JHP .355
Titegroup=3.4 grs. 1050 fps. (Max load)
COL=.955

95 gr. JHP
Titegroup=3.2 grs. 950 fps.
COL=.970


(Note: With regard to posted reloading data, mistakes, typos, etc. happen. Always check any poster's load data with a reputable reloading manual from Speer, Hornady, Sierra, Lyman, etc. before duplicating to ensure it is within safe limits.) The Moderators.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Word of caution....The P380 has a polygonal factory barrel. Lead bullets are not recommended (as a general rule) for use in polygonal barrels due to the risk of accelerated lead build up that can contribute to unsafe pressures. 'Suggest most stick to jacketed or plated unless you are careful about cleaning afterwards.
 

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The five pistols I own with polygonal barrels don't lead amy more than my conventional rifled barrels. The only time I have had any problems was using a fast burning powder with 9MM ammo mostly due to the much faster rate of twist in that caliber. Using a powder with a burning rage from HS-6 to AA#7 has stopped all my problems with the 9.

If you do have a leaded barrel, DONT try to fix it by shooting a jacketed bullet through it, clean it.
 

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brent375hh said:
kraigster414 said:
Word of caution....The P380 has a polygonal factory barrel. Lead bullets are not recommended (as a general rule) for use in polygonal barrels due to the risk of accelerated lead build up that can contribute to unsafe pressures.
The five pistols I own with polygonal barrels don't lead amy more than my conventional rifled barrels. The only time I have had any problems was using a fast burning powder with 9MM ammo mostly due to the much faster rate of twist in that caliber. Using a powder with a burning rage from HS-6 to AA#7 has stopped all my problems with the 9.

If you do have a leaded barrel, DONT try to fix it by shooting a jacketed bullet through it, clean it.
I would suspect that if one cleans his barrells often that leading in poygonal barrle will be no issue but they do recommend not to use lead bullets in polygonal barrels. There has to be a reason for that IMO...
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If you wish to shoot lead bullets in your polygonal P380 barrel just make sure you thoroughly clean the barrel after each range session and I would be careful not to shoot a boatload at one time. A box or two probably will be fine. If you do this, you should be ok. Unfortunately, many do not heed this advice and run the risk of problems ergo my cautionary post. Also the secret is keep you MV's low, i.e., under 1000 fps IMHO to avoid excessive leading (not a problem in the .380) - shooting lead in polygonal barrels in excess of 1100 fps increases the risk of incurring dangerous pressures. For this reason, I limit my cast lead shooting to .380 and .45 ACP.

We have a good thread on this subject at hkpro.com started by yours truly yesterday. There is absolutely nothing wrong with firing a few jacketed rounds through your barrel after shooting a steady dose of lead to loosen-up the fouling. A better alternative is to use a Lewis Lead Remover sold at Brownells.

http://www.hkpro.com/forum/showthread.php?t=108515
 

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I just soak my barrels in a solution of 50% vinegar & 50% hydrogen peroxide for 5 minutes and the lead just falls out. I rarely have to use anything more than a patch pushed through since I don't shoot swaged bullets or commercial cast. The only bad leading I have had was with 9MM and fast powders like bullseye, red dot & WW231.

I put 200-300 cast bullets through my USP 45 without cleaning and
it does not build up any lead.

I can shoot full up loads in my 44 mags (1300-1400 fps) with no
leading either. I cast half linotype half wheelweights and use that greasy Lyman alox lube. The lube in most commercial cast bullets stays in bullet groove as it is more like a crayon that bullet lube.

Your results may vary, but the worst leading I have ever seen was in a S&W 27 (land and groove of course) shot with swaged bullets and a full charge of Unique.
 

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question to your shooters: why is it that we never read of polygonal rifled barrels in revolvers??

I'm asking because I just don't know the answer either. not a pop quiz ;D
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Brent, let's be careful, your reference to shooting lead in your .44 Mag applies to a conventional rifled barrel NOT to a polygonal barrel correct? You should NOT IMHO be shooting lead rounds with MV's of 1400 fps in a polygonal barrel in large quantities at one sitting. As said previously and because I prefer to err on the side of caution, your best bet is to keep your MV's down to under 1000 fps if you want to shoot lead in quantity in a polygonal barrel and then clean thoroughly. We are (maybe) starting to mix things up in this thread and we have to be careful. I too have shot linotype rounds that I used to cast myself in excess of 1300 fps in calibers other than .380 (when safe) with conventional rifled barrels - pistols and rifles with no problems.
 

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The first polygonal pistol I have is a HK P7 that I bought in 1985. You were not suppose to shoot lead bullets in those either, but 12K later the gun still shoots fine. I have had to use the gas tube scraper a lot though. Shooting a G17 proved no problems for me either. Then my USP seems fine with lead, even better than my 1911s. Now I am thinking these polygonal rifled barrels shoot pretty well and seem easier to keep clean.

Fast forward many years and every internet forum says "you can't do that, it's not safe" but yet I don't know of anybody who has actually had a problem. Nor did my late father who ran a gun shop for 17 years

Every gun maker tells you not to shoot reloaded ammo also, but I don't know any serious shooters that don't reload. There are plenty of people that "know" reloaded ammo is unsafe since there are many tales of double charges out there.

I once worked for Bonanza before they were bought by Forster. One day a guy sent us a funny looking press to try. It was newfangled and the owner said it was dangerous because it did too many things at once, I asked to try it and he just told me to take the the thing home forever because he did not want or need it in his shop. I guess I have always been a risk taker since I continue to use that press that Mike Dillon gave him to this day.
 
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